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Matt

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Everything posted by Matt

  1. Forum platforms have a wide range of uses, from helping with support to sharing knowledge, ideation and social interaction. Topics can span years, and once the initial explosion of replies has passed, the topic lives on in local search and search engines for future viewers to discover and get value from. However, it's not always easy to get the best content from a very long topic. You may have noticed that when you come to a topic seeking an answer, some replies are less than helpful. How do I fix my Apple Watch? Like this! It's common to find a lot of social content mixed in with useful replies. Jokes, GIFs and off-topic musings are all great while the topic develops organically in real-time. Having fun is critical to feeling a sense of belonging in a community. However, those coming to the topic a little later, say from a link Google has suggested, just want to get the useful content in the fastest way possible. That's where 'helpful' voting comes in. A very helpful reply Invision Community can already mark a single post as the best solution for that topic. Still, not every topic gets a definitive answer, and some community strategies resist quickly marking a post as the best answer to encourage more discussion rather than effectively ending it. Even when you have a definitive answer, there is often value in other highly rated posts offering more context, alternative solutions and more thorough explanations. With Helpful voting, your members are encouraged to flag which posts they find helpful in the topic. When enough votes are added to a single post, they are suggested as a possible answer. You can also tune out the noise and view the most helpful replies only. This is a powerful way to get the very best content from a topic in a short space of time. Want to just view the most helpful replies? No problem. If you eventually choose to mark a post as the definitive answer, the suggested post will be replaced with the answer you choose, but you can still see the posts voted as helpful to gain further context. The helpful voting works independently from reactions, which tend to cluster around social content. Social media conditions us to add a like or funny reaction to content that gets an emotional response. Indeed, a lot of the most highly reacted content is funny content. Social reactions are valuable when building connections between community members but often don't reflect what is the most useful content. The suggested most helpful post threshold is configuration via the Admin Control Panel. Helping your members find the best content within topics helps them do more in your community with less time. Forums continue to evolve, and while social content helps develop the community, content that solves problems and helps others is the rocket fuel you need to keep members and attract new audiences. Helpful voting also feeds into picking Community Experts, a new feature for Invision Community 5, but we'll talk about that in a future blog. A sneak peak at the new Community Expert badge I hope you found this update ✨helpful✨, and if you have any questions or comments, let me know in the comments! View full blog entry
  2. Forum platforms have a wide range of uses, from helping with support to sharing knowledge, ideation and social interaction. Topics can span years, and once the initial explosion of replies has passed, the topic lives on in local search and search engines for future viewers to discover and get value from. However, it's not always easy to get the best content from a very long topic. You may have noticed that when you come to a topic seeking an answer, some replies are less than helpful. How do I fix my Apple Watch? Like this! It's common to find a lot of social content mixed in with useful replies. Jokes, GIFs and off-topic musings are all great while the topic develops organically in real-time. Having fun is critical to feeling a sense of belonging in a community. However, those coming to the topic a little later, say from a link Google has suggested, just want to get the useful content in the fastest way possible. That's where 'helpful' voting comes in. A very helpful reply Invision Community can already mark a single post as the best solution for that topic. Still, not every topic gets a definitive answer, and some community strategies resist quickly marking a post as the best answer to encourage more discussion rather than effectively ending it. Even when you have a definitive answer, there is often value in other highly rated posts offering more context, alternative solutions and more thorough explanations. With Helpful voting, your members are encouraged to flag which posts they find helpful in the topic. When enough votes are added to a single post, they are suggested as a possible answer. You can also tune out the noise and view the most helpful replies only. This is a powerful way to get the very best content from a topic in a short space of time. Want to just view the most helpful replies? No problem. If you eventually choose to mark a post as the definitive answer, the suggested post will be replaced with the answer you choose, but you can still see the posts voted as helpful to gain further context. The helpful voting works independently from reactions, which tend to cluster around social content. Social media conditions us to add a like or funny reaction to content that gets an emotional response. Indeed, a lot of the most highly reacted content is funny content. Social reactions are valuable when building connections between community members but often don't reflect what is the most useful content. The suggested most helpful post threshold is configuration via the Admin Control Panel. Helping your members find the best content within topics helps them do more in your community with less time. Forums continue to evolve, and while social content helps develop the community, content that solves problems and helps others is the rocket fuel you need to keep members and attract new audiences. Helpful voting also feeds into picking Community Experts, a new feature for Invision Community 5, but we'll talk about that in a future blog. A sneak peak at the new Community Expert badge I hope you found this update ✨helpful✨, and if you have any questions or comments, let me know in the comments!
  3. This isn't something we'll likely do. The emoji picker is pretty universal across all devices and apps and we'd not want to change that.
  4. Mostly to prevent Webmaster tools complaining of duplicate meta tags.
  5. Matt

    IC5: Theme Tools

    Those aren't theme settings as you're used to, those are CSS variables and are exported along with the theme, so you can just export/import the theme between installations.
  6. Indeed, there's a more technical sister blog here: https://invisioncommunity.com/developers/devblog/blog/ic5-theme-tools-r14/?
  7. We have an internal wiki that is quite basic, but we'll eventually get an improved version out to the public (this is a little out of date but you get the idea).
  8. Matt

    IC5: Theme Tools

    Pages is its own thing, I'd imagine more complex templating for databases will be retained for that. Yes, theme export still works as you'd expect containing theme editor settings, any custom CSS from the admin and any designer CSS/JS. Yes, they are retained. The default theme does not have any custom settings, so the tab isn't shown. Yes, you can use existing template syntax in the custom templates.
  9. Ehren will go into more details but things like ipsType_ no longer exists, it's much more structural now.
  10. When Ehren talks about the new CSS structure, you'll see how it all goes together. The new CSS framework is remarkable.
  11. New developer's blog on theme tools for Invision Community 5:
  12. Matt

    IC5: Theme Tools

    Theming has been a core component of Invision Community since its inception, and this continues with Invision Community 5, but in a very different way. If you haven't already seen Ehren's blog on the new Theme Editor, please do take the time to watch it. The all-new theme editor reduces the complexity of theming by taking complex concepts like HSL CSS variables into a pretty slick UI that almost any Invision Community owner can use to personalise or brand match to any existing properties. Ehren will talk more on the technology behind the theme editor in another developer blog soon, but the short version is that the CSS framework has been completely rewritten from scratch with a new approach to how CSS classes interact with page elements. Of course, if you're reading this, you'll want to know what tools you have for more advanced theming in v5. Custom templates and template hooks Invision Community 5 merges the concepts of custom templates and template hooks into a single feature. In the past, you could edit templates directly and create theme hooks. With Invision Community 5, these features are replaced with the new custom template system. You can create new templates, which you can use in other custom templates via the short tag: {customtemplate='key'}. You can also hook into specific areas with a custom template allowing you to insert code before the opening tag, after the opening tag, before the closing tag or after the closing tag. CleanShot 2023-10-19 at 13.17.16.mp4 For example, if you wanted to add something custom before the reply editor when viewing a topic, you would target that area like so: The result, when viewed on the front end, is as follows: These hookable areas are defined by a special tag that we add to the core templates. We would expect a lot of requests through the beta release and will likely create a request form so we can process them. We will try and accommodate as many areas as possible. While direct template editing is no longer possible in Invision Community v5, the new custom template and hook system allows you to add new functionality, while the new CSS framework makes it easier to target and change elements without the need to edit templates. We also added a suite of new development tools to enable you to target menus, data attributes and other areas where developers commonly had to edit templates before. The good news is that now custom templates are not built on top of our 'master' template engine; they are virtually upgrade-proof and do not require manual merging. Theme Designer Mode Those who create themes for others have some extra tooling to enable them to build truly custom themes. Even though the theme editor has space for custom CSS, there is always a need for CSS that your customers cannot edit, and Invision Community 5 has a special area for that once Theme Designer Mode has been enabled. You also can add any ad-hoc javascript for when you want to hide elements or provide custom interactions. As direct CSS editing and direct template editing are no longer possible with Invision Community 5, there is no need for a 'sync' tool to copy from the filesystem. Conclusion The new front-end theme editor is now the primary way to manage themes. This is where you upload logos and toggle settings. As you can see, theming may look different in Invision Community v5. Still, the new custom templates, theme designer tools and UI extensions provide a lot of functionality that means you can do nearly everything you did in v4, but often in an easier way. I'm sure you'll have many questions, so please add them below, and we'll do our best to answer them for you.
  13. Matt

    classic license

    The self hosted version ($499) comes with clubs and achievements (as well as forums, gallery, Pages, commerce, downloads, calendar, etc). More information here: https://invisioncommunity.com/buy/self-hosted/
  14. Matt

    classic license

    You can renew at any point 24 months after purchase and retain support and access to upgrades. After that 24 month period, assuming that you do not renew you can continue using your Invision Community without any issues. You will however no longer have access to support and updates. If you wish to upgrade in the future you can purchase a new license. Please do keep in mind that we do not tie our licenses to specific versions; it's not abnormal to ask for a new license payment for each major version in the world of licensed software which would mean that you'd have had to pay for v1, v2, v3, etc. We offer regular updates beyond bug fixing and maintenance. We add a lot of functionality to our product In the past 2 years, we've released 22 updates which have added the following: - Improvements to streams - Improvements to SEO - New reporting tools and metrics - New features for achievements - Combined forum stream/fluid view - New spam captcha tools - New alert system - Ability to disable your PM inbox - Easier ways to edit a theme - Trending content feature (cloud only) - Revamped Calendar into a new Events app - Moderator approval queue improvements - Moderating with personal alerts - New Gallery features - GraphQL - Live Topics (cloud only) - Downloads updates - Email bounce management (cloud only) - Courses app (cloud only) - New privacy and PII data features - New statistics engine - More spam prevention features Along with hundreds of bug fixes. As you can see, the software is continually improving making it a very different experience from where it was in October 2021. We had to find a new viable license format for v5 to ensure we can keep offering a self-hosted version for the foreseeable future and we feel this strikes the balance of fairness for both you and us. In the past we've just asked for a renewal for any license, potentially purchased ten years ago and you'll get tens of thousands of hours of development across multiple versions for just $40. We felt moving forwards that this would be detrimental to the costs of maintaining the self hosted version. I also want to point out again that you are welcome to use the version you initially paid for beyond the two year renewal limit. I've seen people suggest that you need to take down the software or DMCAs, etc will be issued which is not true at all. We would hope that serious community owners will keep their renewals up-to-date to ensure they get the latest features, bug fixes and security updates and that $199 a year is a very reasonable cost for this. If you are only thinking about upgrading every 3-5 years then perhaps Invision Community isn't a good fit given our continual releases bring our customers timely bug fixes and new features to help their communities be successful.
  15. It is likely that some after market developers will leave, nothing stays static and change is inevitable. One of the main themes coming through v5 is reducing the complexity for things that used to require developers so there will be less opportunity to sell expertise in certain areas. It's why we moved forward with the directory approach. There is a strong future in providing bespoke development services.
  16. It's also worth noting that the removal of JS and CSS removes render blocking items, whereas cover photos are additional bandwidth but do not stop the page from rendering until loaded.
  17. The extra cost would make it the same as a cloud plan.
  18. You're focusing on Classic versus Cloud but it's more granular than that, as Charles explained.
  19. AdminCP theme settings 🤔 Where we're going, we don't need no ACP theme settings. Next week's blog should really help clear up what theming looks like in v5. Spoiler: It'll be very different.
  20. Not a lot off the top of my head, @Daniel F?
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