Jump to content

IC5: Developer Center

As part of our commitment to encourage 3rd party development and extension, we have given our Developer Center a much needed makeover. A picture is worth a thousand words, but how about a video?

 

Highlights

  • The Developer Center now has its own dedicated tab in the ACP.
  • What were previously tabs are now displayed on individual screens, making for a far less cluttered UI.
  • You can easily switch from one application to another using the main menu or the button at the top right of the screen.
  • We've implemented UI for some JSON files that previously had to be manually created; specifically acpsearch.json and furl.json
  • We've replaced the "Support" button at the top of the ACP with a more helpful "Quick Links" dropdown menu. While this is not specific to developers, with easy access to things like the Task Manager and clearing caches, it's very handy for troubleshooting!

 

Application Landing Page

When you open the Developer Center for a particular application, the landing page is designed to help you quickly access common functions, and to help you find any potential issues within your code.

Could contain: Page, Text, File, Webpage

 

The Application Scanner currently checks for:

  • Missing Admin CP Language Strings
  • Missing Front-End Language Strings
  • Missing EditorLocations extensions
  • Missing FileStorage extensions
  • Missing FrontNavigation extensions
  • Missing FURLs
  • Missing Email Templates

 

Language strings are grouped so that can you easily see where the missing strings were detected.

Could contain: Page, Text, White Board

 

We will continue to expand the scanners over the course of the next few months.

 

Thoughts?

What do you think? Are there any other useful features you'd like to see added to the Dev Center? What kind of scans can we implement on the landing page?

Comments

Recommended Comments

I'm not sure how the scanner works right now, but I guess it scans the used language strings and checks if they exist in the lang.php file? If so, it should also check for required language strings that the system expects when you add a specific extension/feature/node/etc.

For example, when you add a Node/Item that supports search, you need to add specific language strings for the quick search menu, contextual search menu, etc. All those language strings are not documented anywhere. Another thing to check are the required language string for admin/moderator restrictions in ACP.

There are a few more areas, but I can't remember them now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, teraßyte said:

I'm not sure how the scanner works right now, but I guess it scans the used language strings and checks if they exist in the lang.php file? If so, it should also check for required language strings that the system expects when you add a specific extension/feature/node/etc.

For example, when you add a Node/Item that supports search, you need to add specific language strings for the quick search menu, contextual search menu, etc. All those language strings are not documented anywhere. Another thing to check are the required language string for admin/moderator restrictions in ACP.

There are a few more areas, but I can't remember them now.

Yes, it checks all of those things.

To clarify: It actually does NOT scan for used language strings. It scans for required/suggested language strings. So for example, it reads your acpmenu.json and makes sure that you have all the 'menu__' strings set up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


×
×
  • Create New...