Jump to content

Community

Translating the community without translating the ACP ?


SecondSight
 Share

Recommended Posts

The tool won't help much. Basically, yeah, you need to translate all if you want to be thorough. If you invest a little bit time in it sooner or later you will get a "feel" which strings are from frontend and which from the backend. For example all _menu_ strings are part of the ACP menu.

With 4.0 IPS introduced a lot of changes to the translation tools, but most of them have been visual gimmicks with little practical usefulness (like the mentioned "View key words"). And they removed the separation of Admin CP/Frontend language strings. So one step forward, ten steps back.

The ability to pluralize is the only amazing change I like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll be honest, why would you want to only translate the front end? If your site is in one language why would you be more comfortable to reading the ACP in English?

The only time English is required is when you have an IPS staff member looking in your ACP for a problem and as long as you haven't removed the English Language pack, its easy enough to enable it and allow the IPS staff member to use it and disable it when they are done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Morrigan said:

I'll be honest, why would you want to only translate the front end? If your site is in one language why would you be more comfortable to reading the ACP in English?

The only time English is required is when you have an IPS staff member looking in your ACP for a problem and as long as you haven't removed the English Language pack, its easy enough to enable it and allow the IPS staff member to use it and disable it when they are done.

As you are English native it is understandable to have these questions, probably the reason IPS decided to "simplify" it by merging everything together. But for all users with translated communities the effect on this is huge. The main reasons are:

1. Much less effort in translating. Translating the software takes a lot of time and is mindbogglingly boring. Like really. Trust me. As most communities have only 1 or 2 people with ACP access and usually technically apt people have also reasonable English, it is not necessary to have the English in the backend as well. So reason number 1 - having the strings separate saves you a lot from translating strings that no end user will ever see. 

2. Not sure how it is for other languages, but for mine, it is much easier to communicate technical terms in English. Sure, we do have localization on windows, android, all major pieces of software, but it is much easier for me to keep it in English as I have learned what this button does and what this label actually means in English. This brings two benefits:

- first I know what IPS is talking about when they say for example "Admin control panel notifications are improved", if I have "admin control panel" and "notifications" in my language, it is more difficult for me to realize what they are saying. 

- I can easily communicate back to them using the same terms. If I have ACP translated, I will have to translate back when asking for support and the back translation won't always be accurate. For example "notifications" can be translated in my language and when I translate it back it might be "news" or something like that. If I raise a support ticket "My news are not working", you can see there will be tons of confusion and my example is extremely simple. 

Really, even with simple and mundane buttons like copy/paste/cancel, you might have issues once they are localized. Even if I had a free professional ACP translation provided to me for free, I would still prefer to keep it in English. 

Hope this clarifies it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use technologies, such as cookies, to customise content and advertising, to provide social media features and to analyse traffic to the site. We also share information about your use of our site with our trusted social media, advertising and analytics partners. See more about cookies and our Privacy Policy